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Weekly Download | Nikki Lane, "Gone, Gone, Gone"

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This week's download comes from up & coming atl-country artist Nikki Lane, who performed for 88Nine's Studio:Milwaukee last week.  You have 7 days to grab this amazing song called "Gone, Gone, Gone."

One glorious day some years back, a teenage high school dropout Nikki Lane (née Nicole Lane Frady) packed a trailer with her worldly possessions. With one hand firmly gripping a steering wheel and the other flipping the bird, she said so long to her home, Greenville, South Carolina, The South and any sort of life it had suggested she should live. Western bound, she was headed to Los Angeles for no other reason than just because.

Flash forward to today and we find Lane an empowered artist, having escaped any sweet and sour small town trappings for some serious see-my-name-in-lights grandeur and artistic fulfillment. Signed recently to the flourishing Los Angeles-based indie label, IAMSOUND Records, Lane’s bold vocal chops and wildly infectious personality have been making a stir in circles spanning across country to rock to indie and back again. Working with producers David Cobb (Shooter Jennings, The Secret Sisters) and Lewis Pesacov of Fool’s Gold, the first release of these efforts was the four-song EP, Gone, Gone, Gone, released July 19th and will be followed by the 11-track full length Walk of Shame out September 27th.

Throughout Walk of Shame, Lane weaves in and out of ballads of heartache, one-night stands, leaving, lust and longing. She plays the rambler and sometimes drunkard with such an ardent aptitude she’d fit right in alongside classic country icons like Patsy Cline, Loretta Lynn and Dolly Parton. On the title track she swears never again will she wake in a stranger’s bed, “with a bass drum thumping in her head” as the music drives us out of that alien apartment and down the street into the break of dawn. In “Gone, Gone, Gone,” while a blistering slide guitar cries on, she croons on the chorus her tale of leaving The South, promising, “And if I leave this town I’ll be gone, gone, gone and I won’t be back for far too long.” Meanwhile, hitting a more delicate note, Lane shows off softer sentiments and solid song-writing skills on “Save You,” crooning helplessly, “Well your bad habits they’re all stacking up and it’s plain to see you just can’t get enough. And I’m trying to break through but I’m losing sight. Oh what can I do to make it all right? How can I save you from yourself?”