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88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Today's stream is sponsored by Maxie's

Sound Travels The New! From Bomba Estereo to Bhangra and Back Again

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Domenico "Cine Prive" Cine Prive

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Sweet modern update of Brazil's classic, forward-thinking tropicalia styles by Brazilian Dominco, the son of samba legend Ivor Lancellotti. Domenico writes and co-writes all the songs, sings, plays guitar and designs the rhythmically adventurous soundscapes heard on Cine Privê. Cine Privê finds Domenico more introspective and delicate than on his previous album with the +2’s (the collaborative and experimental rock group with Moreno Veloso & Kassin). Built on heady, intriguing rhythms and textural tones, Cine Privê is reminiscent of the classic 70's sambistas but manages to stay fresher than mere imitations; using ideas born in that era in a way that is less retro than futuristic.

 

Monsieur Privê "La Muerte" Hecho A Mano

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Remember swing? The music not the alternative lifestyle of the 70's? Probly not unless you're actually 70, or from Colombia where swing making an unlikely comeback. Upbeat and infectious, classic swing has found a new Premier, Colombia's Monsieur Perine, who's turning it out with a freshness. While many modern Colombian artists are incorporating new tech methods into classic Latin styles, Monsieur Perine has mainly looked backward to jazz manouche, the French adaptation of American swing which filled Parisians cafes and dance halls in the 1930s. Even with their French connection, they have also incorporated many Latin styles into their music including bolero,samba, son cubano, cumbia and tango. Call it Colombian swing, or whatever you want, this is fresh!

 

 

Bomba Estereo "Lo Que Tengo Que Decir" Elegancia Tropical

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The long awaited, full-length follow up to Bomba Estereo's debut album Blow Up!, Elegancia Tropical finds the Colombian band refining their electro-tropical sound beyond the beats and bangers of their first release (while keeping them!) and adding a touch more sensitive. Subtle, without losing the edgy drive and good times that propelled Bomba Estéreo up charts and onto hip festival stages from Coachella to Bonnaroo. Grooves grown organically from afro-Colombian roots and nurtured by elements that should sound foreign, but for the swagger and style that has already made this band a signifier of all things tropical;  hot sound of successes. 

 

Diljit Donsanjh & Tru-Skool "iPhone" Back To Basics

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This is Diljit’s first solo album in 3 years, having released The Next Level in 2009 with Honey Singh. Apparently, Diljit is a star on the bhangra scene, though that means prolly nothing in Milwaukee, it did give me pause long enough to listen. And overall, Back To Basics is solid for a bhangra album and shines in a way that is endearing to my DJ's sense; that he can bounce on a beat. And there are a couple of burners on this album; crosover jams that wok within the context of hip hop and dancehall. For me, bhangra like this is the best for those uninitiated to the genre at all, and a big reason why I brought it for Sound Travels today.

 

Bless!