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88Nine Radio Milwaukee

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Concert Review: St.Vincent at Turner Hall Ballroom (4/4/14)

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  • Photo Credit: Erik Ljung

It’s a Friday night at Turner Hall and it’s a sold out show. The crowd containing all forms of what St. Vincent welcomed as “Ladies, Gentleman, and others.” Born Annie Clark, the mastermind behind St. Vincent, does not have enough adjectives to express her talented stage presence.  The thirty one year old, released "St. Vincent" on February 25 of this year. A mixture of chamber rock, pop, indie rock, and cabaret jazz. Milwaukee was lucky to have her presence, and recent full-album, performance.

A little chorography to the side, some shoulder action, love at first sight-dead starry eyes, I’m sure all of us in the crowd felt like she was directly starring at one self, and we were okay with it. All that in the opening of “Rattlesnake".  

Following non-stop playing from “Digital Witness” to “Cruel” when Clark did take a moment to break she found a way to influence us with a bit of wit and tad of insight. “We are all going to die someday…but not tonight.”

Wasn't it a known fact that Clark shreds like nobody else.  However to choreograph a routine with her guitarist-keyboardist in crime (angel voice, full of thunder) Toko Yasuda is another thing.

Clark made the stage hers. From being on top of the pedestal, crawling down, how could we forget the bunny hops back and forth. To enhance the theatrical stage performance, strobe lights, with Clark’s own voice like an angel, and guitar shredding made the atmosphere.  We could feel the digital vibrations.

The encore could have been all she played and we could have left happy, starting with a solo rendition of "Strange Mercy" on guitar. If wasn't memorable enough St. Vincent brought the feels with a special encore addition by performing Nirvana's "Lithium.” You could tell how this song touched some folks in the crowd. Clark ended the night with "Your Lips Are Red," the song containing all that St. Vincent is; though provoking, an indie feminist hero, funky, and a boisterous noise creator.